Archive for the ‘Links’ Category


A few minutes ago on May 5, 2011, Arab TV announced that Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khameini requested Iran’s President Ahmadinejad to step down from his post. This has not been confirmed nor verified by Western media as yet, however, it has been reported that several of his close aides are already under arrest.

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One can only hope this is going to actually happen. It hasn’t yet. Might not even. But we can hope and pray. And maybe somewhere in the near future possibly start to have some normalized relations with Iran.

No matter what id take this with a grain of salt.

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His predecessor, George W. Bush, just three days after hijacked planes destroyed the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers, had stood bullhorn in hand in the smoldering wreckage to declare, “The people who knocked these buildings down will hear all of us soon.”

Almost a decade later, in a bookend to that historic visit, Obama came to New York to say that promise had been kept.

He said the killing of bin Laden told the world “that when we say we will never forget, we mean what we say.”

Obama visited Engine 54 in midtown, which with 15 deaths lost more members on 9/11 than any other firehouse, before heading to Lower Manhattan to talk with police and lay a wreath at Ground Zero, the Twin Towers site, where he also met with victims’ families.

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Subways and cabs let out a steady stream of flag-carrying New Yorkers, as chants of “USA, USA” broke out before turning to group renditions of “God Bless America” and other patriotic songs. Homemade placards broke the night sky, while more daring partiers climbed light poles and traffic lights to lead cheers. A number of military veterans were on hand, too, soaking in the event as a sort of makeshift victorious homecoming.

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I am as we all should be, very happy for the people of NYC, they have been though a lot over these past ten years. But they as well as the rest of us should not forget. This is not over. Not by a long shot. Don’t think for one second there won’t be some sort of an attempt at retaliation. While I hope there isn’t, common sense says there will be.


It wouldn’t just be his speech. Soros was one of three panelists speaking about a new edition of The Constitution of Liberty, the most enduring book by the libertarian economist Freidrich von Hayek. The editor of the new edition, Ronald Hamowy, was tasked with introducing the experts, moderating questions, and keeping the whole thing from becoming a circus. He eyed the audience warily, hopefully.

The worry was that someone would show up at the panel and decide to confront George Soros, philosophical dabbler, with George Soros, the nightmare figure who shows up on Fox News prime time the way Emmanuel Goldstein showed up at the Two Minutes Hate. Soros, who made his billions in international finance, has funded many of the new institutions of the professional left since George W. Bush started seeking re-election. He seeded ACT, a get-out-the-vote project that didn’t quite work in 2004, and then he helped fund the Center for American Progress ($3 million) and Media Matters for America ($1 million, only last year). Entering politics, he became a political target. He’s the sort of billionaire whose website has to include a FAQ about where he was when the Nazis invaded Eastern Europe, because someone who Googles his name and “collaborator” gets a lot of false results.

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Roughly 1 million people in the U.S. were unable to find work after exhausting their unemployment benefits over the past year, Labor Department data released Thursday suggest.

Economists said the back-of-the-envelope calculation is yet another sign that the labor market remains weak.

About 8.2 million idled workers were receiving unemployment benefits as of the week ended April 9, the Labor Department said in its weekly jobless claims report. This compares with about 10.5 million individuals at the same time last year, resulting in a decline of roughly 2.3 million people.

The federal government estimates that the economy created 1.3 million jobs during the 12 months ended in March.

“That leaves, roughly speaking, about 1 million people who have exhausted their unemployment benefits and have very likely not yet found a job,” said Joshua Shapiro, chief U.S. economist at MFR Inc. in New York.

But Nicholas Tenev of Barclays Capital said a precise figure is hard to calculate. He estimated the labor force has shrunk by 638,000 since March of last year, largely because of a demographic shift as baby boomers retire.

“While we don’t have an estimate of our own of how many people have exhausted all their benefits and are unable to find work, 1 million sounds high to me,” Tenev said.

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This goes along with things I have been saying for months. The economy isn’t’ getting better, the jobs being created are low paying, minimum wage opportunites which aren’t necessarily paying these peoples bills.


His 2008 campaign left the alarmist congressman with a fanatical following, a national organization, and clout. But he’s still not sure he wants to run against a Mitt Romney or Tim Pawlenty in 2012—as his son waits in the wings. Patricia Murphy reports.

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WASHINGTON – Prodded by an insistent President Barack Obama, Congress’ top two lawmakers sought to reinvigorate compromise talks Tuesday aimed at cutting tens of billions in federal spending and averting a partial government shutdown Friday at midnight.

There was at least a hint of flexibility, accompanied by sharply partisan attacks and an outburst of shutdown brinksmanship.

According to Democrats, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, suggested at a White House meeting that fellow Republicans might be able to accept a deal with $40 billion in cuts. That’s more than negotiators had been eyeing but less than the House seeks.

The speaker’s office declined comment, and Boehner issued a statement saying, “We can still avoid a shutdown, but Democrats are going to need to get serious about cutting spending – and soon.”

For his part, Senate Majority leader Harry Reid sounded an accusatory note. “I hope the Republicans do what the country needs, not what they believe the tea party wants,” he said at the Capitol

“I mean, it seems that every step we take, it’s something just to poke us in the eye,” he said.

Boehner and Reid met privately later in the day. While there was no indication of substantive progress, there was a marked change in tone afterwards.

Spokesmen for the two issued identical statements, shorn of partisan bickering, saying the two leaders “had a productive discussion. They agreed to continue working on a budget solution.”

Obama stepped forcefully into the dispute, at times sounding like an exasperated parent.

He convened a meeting at the White House with the chief congressional antagonists, rejected a Republican proposal for an interim bill with sharp cuts and then announced Boehner and Reid would meet later in the day.

If they can’t sort out their differences, he said, “I want them back here tomorrow.”

And if that doesn’t work, he added, “we’ll invite them again the day after that. And I will have my entire team available to work through the details of getting a deal done.”

Obama, eager to regain the confidence of independent voters as he seeks a new term, said the American public expects that its leaders “act like grown-ups, and when we are in negotiations like this, that everybody gives a little bit, compromises a little bit in order to do the people’s business.”

At issue is legislation needed to keep the government running through the Sept. 30 end of the budget year, and a desire by all sides to avoid being blamed politically if there is a shutdown.

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