Posts Tagged ‘president obama’


Yes I know this is older, but it’s fitting.

Obamabinladin

Remember Obama fan you asked for this.


Obama2

His predecessor, George W. Bush, just three days after hijacked planes destroyed the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers, had stood bullhorn in hand in the smoldering wreckage to declare, “The people who knocked these buildings down will hear all of us soon.”

Almost a decade later, in a bookend to that historic visit, Obama came to New York to say that promise had been kept.

He said the killing of bin Laden told the world “that when we say we will never forget, we mean what we say.”

Obama visited Engine 54 in midtown, which with 15 deaths lost more members on 9/11 than any other firehouse, before heading to Lower Manhattan to talk with police and lay a wreath at Ground Zero, the Twin Towers site, where he also met with victims’ families.

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For Immediate Release                              May 1, 2011

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT

ON OSAMA BIN LADEN

East Room

11:35 P.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Good evening.  Tonight, I can report to the American people and to the world that the United States has conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of al Qaeda, and a terrorist who’s responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women, and children.

It was nearly 10 years ago that a bright September day was darkened by the worst attack on the American people in our history.  The images of 9/11 are seared into our national memory — hijacked planes cutting through a cloudless September sky; the Twin Towers collapsing to the ground; black smoke billowing up from the Pentagon; the wreckage of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, where the actions of heroic citizens saved even more heartbreak and destruction.

And yet we know that the worst images are those that were unseen to the world.  The empty seat at the dinner table.  Children who were forced to grow up without their mother or their father.  Parents who would never know the feeling of their child’s embrace.  Nearly 3,000 citizens taken from us, leaving a gaping hole in our hearts.

On September 11, 2001, in our time of grief, the American people came together.  We offered our neighbors a hand, and we offered the wounded our blood.  We reaffirmed our ties to each other, and our love of community and country.  On that day, no matter where we came from, what God we prayed to, or what race or ethnicity we were, we were united as one American family.

We were also united in our resolve to protect our nation and to bring those who committed this vicious attack to justice.  We quickly learned that the 9/11 attacks were carried out by al Qaeda — an organization headed by Osama bin Laden, which had openly declared war on the United States and was committed to killing innocents in our country and around the globe.  And so we went to war against al Qaeda to protect our citizens, our friends, and our allies.

Over the last 10 years, thanks to the tireless and heroic work of our military and our counterterrorism professionals, we’ve made great strides in that effort.  We’ve disrupted terrorist attacks and strengthened our homeland defense.  In Afghanistan, we removed the Taliban government, which had given bin Laden and al Qaeda safe haven and support.  And around the globe, we worked with our friends and allies to capture or kill scores of al Qaeda terrorists, including several who were a part of the 9/11 plot.

Yet Osama bin Laden avoided capture and escaped across the Afghan border into Pakistan.  Meanwhile, al Qaeda continued to operate from along that border and operate through its affiliates across the world.

And so shortly after taking office, I directed Leon Panetta, the director of the CIA, to make the killing or capture of bin Laden the top priority of our war against al Qaeda, even as we continued our broader efforts to disrupt, dismantle, and defeat his network.

Then, last August, after years of painstaking work by our intelligence community, I was briefed on a possible lead to bin Laden.  It was far from certain, and it took many months to run this thread to ground.  I met repeatedly with my national security team as we developed more information about the possibility that we had located bin Laden hiding within a compound deep inside of Pakistan.  And finally, last week, I determined that we had enough intelligence to take action, and authorized an operation to get Osama bin Laden and bring him to justice.

Today, at my direction, the United States launched a targeted operation against that compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan.  A small team of Americans carried out the operation with extraordinary courage and capability.  No Americans were harmed.  They took care to avoid civilian casualties.  After a firefight, they killed Osama bin Laden and took custody of his body.

For over two decades, bin Laden has been al Qaeda’s leader and symbol, and has continued to plot attacks against our country and our friends and allies.  The death of bin Laden marks the most significant achievement to date in our nation’s effort to defeat al Qaeda.

Yet his death does not mark the end of our effort.  There’s no doubt that al Qaeda will continue to pursue attacks against us.  We must –- and we will — remain vigilant at home and abroad.

As we do, we must also reaffirm that the United States is not –- and never will be -– at war with Islam.  I’ve made clear, just as President Bush did shortly after 9/11, that our war is not against Islam.  Bin Laden was not a Muslim leader; he was a mass murderer of Muslims.  Indeed, al Qaeda has slaughtered scores of Muslims in many countries, including our own.  So his demise should be welcomed by all who believe in peace and human dignity.

Over the years, I’ve repeatedly made clear that we would take action within Pakistan if we knew where bin Laden was.  That is what we’ve done.  But it’s important to note that our counterterrorism cooperation with Pakistan helped lead us to bin Laden and the compound where he was hiding.  Indeed, bin Laden had declared war against Pakistan as well, and ordered attacks against the Pakistani people.

Tonight, I called President Zardari, and my team has also spoken with their Pakistani counterparts.  They agree that this is a good and historic day for both of our nations.  And going forward, it is essential that Pakistan continue to join us in the fight against al Qaeda and its affiliates.

The American people did not choose this fight.  It came to our shores, and started with the senseless slaughter of our citizens.  After nearly 10 years of service, struggle, and sacrifice, we know well the costs of war.  These efforts weigh on me every time I, as Commander-in-Chief, have to sign a letter to a family that has lost a loved one, or look into the eyes of a service member who’s been gravely wounded.

So Americans understand the costs of war.  Yet as a country, we will never tolerate our security being threatened, nor stand idly by when our people have been killed.  We will be relentless in defense of our citizens and our friends and allies.  We will be true to the values that make us who we are. And on nights like this one, we can say to those families who have lost loved ones to al Qaeda’s terror:  Justice has been done.

Tonight, we give thanks to the countless intelligence and counterterrorism professionals who’ve worked tirelessly to achieve this outcome.  The American people do not see their work, nor know their names.  But tonight, they feel the satisfaction of their work and the result of their pursuit of justice.

We give thanks for the men who carried out this operation, for they exemplify the professionalism, patriotism, and unparalleled courage of those who serve our country.  And they are part of a generation that has borne the heaviest share of the burden since that September day.

Finally, let me say to the families who lost loved ones on 9/11 that we have never forgotten your loss, nor wavered in our commitment to see that we do whatever it takes to prevent another attack on our shores.

And tonight, let us think back to the sense of unity that prevailed on 9/11.  I know that it has, at times, frayed.  Yet today’s achievement is a testament to the greatness of our country and the determination of the American people.

The cause of securing our country is not complete.  But tonight, we are once again reminded that America can do whatever we set our mind to.  That is the story of our history, whether it’s the pursuit of prosperity for our people, or the struggle for equality for all our citizens; our commitment to stand up for our values abroad, and our sacrifices to make the world a safer place.

Let us remember that we can do these things not just because of wealth or power, but because of who we are:  one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Thank you.  May God bless you.  And may God bless the United States of America.



Service members will not get paid and a significant number of Defense Department civilian employees will be furloughed, a senior Obama administration official said Wednesday in a conference call with reporters.

That is the administration’s most definitive statement to date on whether troops will be paid if the government shuts down. A shutdown will happen if Congress does not pass a spending measure to keep agencies funded once an existing stopgap measure expires at midnight Friday.

The White House and Congress remained deadlocked on budget legislation to carry the government past that point. If no deal is reached by then, numerous government functions will cease on Saturday morning. Exceptions will be made for operations necessary for the protection of life and property, and those that are funded through some means other than annual appropriations, the senior administration official said.

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OK so let me get this straight. Military personel will not be paid during a shutdown. Yes I know many of them only get paid monthly and may not be effected. Still what incentive would you have in going to work (possibly die for your country) if you knew you might not be paid? Would you still have that same patriotic feeling if you knew your family back home wasn’t receiving your checks? Would you be happy about it?


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America’s Fiscal Future: Paul Ryan’s budget plan dramatically slows spending growth, gets entitlements under control and begins the arduous task of easing the nation’s crippling debt load. So what’s not to like?

As Congress argues over a measly $33 billion in cuts to the 2011 budget to keep the government from shutting down, the plan by House Budget Chairman Ryan for 2012 and beyond not only reverses the Democrats’ profligacy but returns the U.S. to a path of fiscal responsibility.

The plan trims $6.2 trillion from President Obama’s budget (see chart), driving outlays back below 20% of GDP, their historic average, and well below the 25% in Obama’s budget.

As for the squealing of the Democrats over vicious “cuts,” spending actually grows from 2011 to 2021 under Ryan’s plan by $1.12 trillion — an increase of 31%, or 3.1% a year. So those who say government is being “slashed” are being disingenuous.

In contrast, since Democrats took over Congress in 2006, spending has risen $1.2 trillion, or 44%. That amounts to a yearly gain of 9% that has pushed us to the brink of insolvency.

One thing that Ryan does slash is the deficit — by $4.4 trillion over 10 years. That’s $4.4 trillion less for our children and grandchildren to repay. More importantly, debt peaks at a projected 74.5% of GDP in 2013, then recedes to 67.5% by 2021 — vs. 87.4% under Obama’s budget.

This is accomplished mainly by reforming entitlement and welfare spending in ways that lower costs while giving people more choices.

Ryan starts by overturning ObamaCare, saving hundreds of billions of dollars in higher taxes. Then, for the first time ever, he proposes serious reforms for Medicare, the greatest danger to America’s fiscal health.

Instead of government paying providers directly and deciding what their services are worth, new retirees would receive “premium support” to help them buy insurance on the open market — similar to the much-envied plan that Congress itself has now.

Ryan also reforms the welfare system, giving block grants to states for both Medicaid and food stamps. This gets the federal government out of the business of micromanaging Americans’ choices and puts states in charge, as it should be.

None of this, of course, works without a healthy economy. To that end, following President Reagan’s notably successful lead, Ryan proposes a bold tax reform — one that reduces the top corporate and individual tax rates from 36% and 39.6%, respectively, to 25%, and gets rid of many of what Ryan calls “deductions and loopholes” that make our tax code hideously complex and costly.

This is a great plan. And it’s one that Americans, weary of the Big Government meddling of recent years, are ready to embrace. The only question is: Can Democrats muster the political wisdom and courage to support something from the opposition that would work?

The main reason the dems won’t go for it. It repeals ObamaCare. Can’t have that now can they. If they did it would be an admission that ObamaCare was a bad idea and would have ultimately been a failure that would have completed the job of bankrupting a nation.


WASHINGTON – Prodded by an insistent President Barack Obama, Congress’ top two lawmakers sought to reinvigorate compromise talks Tuesday aimed at cutting tens of billions in federal spending and averting a partial government shutdown Friday at midnight.

There was at least a hint of flexibility, accompanied by sharply partisan attacks and an outburst of shutdown brinksmanship.

According to Democrats, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, suggested at a White House meeting that fellow Republicans might be able to accept a deal with $40 billion in cuts. That’s more than negotiators had been eyeing but less than the House seeks.

The speaker’s office declined comment, and Boehner issued a statement saying, “We can still avoid a shutdown, but Democrats are going to need to get serious about cutting spending – and soon.”

For his part, Senate Majority leader Harry Reid sounded an accusatory note. “I hope the Republicans do what the country needs, not what they believe the tea party wants,” he said at the Capitol

“I mean, it seems that every step we take, it’s something just to poke us in the eye,” he said.

Boehner and Reid met privately later in the day. While there was no indication of substantive progress, there was a marked change in tone afterwards.

Spokesmen for the two issued identical statements, shorn of partisan bickering, saying the two leaders “had a productive discussion. They agreed to continue working on a budget solution.”

Obama stepped forcefully into the dispute, at times sounding like an exasperated parent.

He convened a meeting at the White House with the chief congressional antagonists, rejected a Republican proposal for an interim bill with sharp cuts and then announced Boehner and Reid would meet later in the day.

If they can’t sort out their differences, he said, “I want them back here tomorrow.”

And if that doesn’t work, he added, “we’ll invite them again the day after that. And I will have my entire team available to work through the details of getting a deal done.”

Obama, eager to regain the confidence of independent voters as he seeks a new term, said the American public expects that its leaders “act like grown-ups, and when we are in negotiations like this, that everybody gives a little bit, compromises a little bit in order to do the people’s business.”

At issue is legislation needed to keep the government running through the Sept. 30 end of the budget year, and a desire by all sides to avoid being blamed politically if there is a shutdown.

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